Sunday, 22 March 2015

Just imagine.

This blog is fully inspired by my children. I have 3 young children that all love imaginary play...and they all love mum to be involved. They each have their own specific favourites they like to play so I am kept very busy in various different roles. This week I have been, in no particular order, a mummy tiger, baby tiger, dog, puppy, school pupil, black pig (a very frequent and specific requirement by the 2 year old!) a monster, pop star, restaurant customer, cat, dog rescue person, doctor, super hero and a horse!!

I have always engaged in this type of play with them but over the past few months I have noticed that my ability to actually be present in mind, not just in body, has increased.

Before, whilst crawling round the house (with a lead attached to me) and barking periodically, I would be thinking of the washing up that needs doing, the tumble dryer that needs emptying, the ironing pile that's spilling over the basket etc. So whilst I was there with them, at their very mercy and complying with their strange requests, I wasn't mentally there and therefore was just going through the motions to keep them happy.

However, in a bid to resurrect my ability to experience my "free child" I have started to approach this creative play with a different mindset and allow myself to be fully present in the moment and embrace the acting requirements. And I have had so much fun and received so much satisfaction from doing so.

My stint as a popstar however, provided me with the inspiration to tackle an issue I have with listening to music. I love music but for a few years now I have struggled with being able to listen to it because I just find it too painful. Either a specific song or just lyrics in general will trigger a memory, a thought or emotion and I kind of gave up listening to anything because my mood would just plummet.

I miss music though and would love to be able to just turn on the radio without being so negatively effected. So spurred on by pretending to be Katy Perry with my daughter, I have resorted to driving to work, music full blast and imagining myself on stage singing and owning the emotion. And I have to say it's working. I have been able to drive to work, playing a CD that I love but would previously have me in floods of tears.

I have taken it a step further and, if the song is something to do with love or healing, I imagine that I'm singing to my inner child. Now, my singing skills are not good at all and unfortunately no amount of pretending is going to improve this. So for now, my inner musical goddess is confined to the boundaries of the car, but I am hoping that in time music may be able to re-enter my life without my need to screech along with it!

Rosie
A Moodscope member.