Saturday, 4 May 2013

Dr Seuss had it right.

As I explained yesterday, I've had to take the difficult decision to leave Moodscope, which has pretty much been my life over the last five years.

Now, last April I blogged about Theodor Geisel, the author of the Dr Seuss books and the benefactor who funded the main library at the University of California, San Diego - in which I did much of the research work on which Moodscope was founded.

I mentioned him a year ago, and do so again, because of his inspiring quotation: 'Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened'. Actually his authorship of these words is disputed, but whether he originally wrote them or not, he certainly helped bring them to the public eye.

One thing of which there's no doubt is that I'm sad about moving on from Moodscope, and of course I'm disappointed that it has come to this - but I'm definitely also smiling about my incredible adventures during my time with it (and you).

More than 36,000 people read Moodscope's messages every day (we send out well over a million emails a month). The Institute of Psychiatry carried out independent research into Moodscope which shows it to have clinical potential. I've even lectured about my work at Tsinghua University in Beijing.

Of course Moodscope is the sum of its parts rather than being the work of one, so I say this not to blow my own trumpet but to remind us both that there's usually more than one side to view most of what life sends our way.

When your mood is low, it's easy to see the negatives in what happens to you, but far harder to remember that there may also be positives - even if they're lurking beneath the surface.

As well as reminding me of Dr Seuss, it reminds me of one of cognitive behavioural therapy's thinking errors - 'all or nothing thinking' - which I write more about in my new ebook. Download a free copy:

http://www.joncousins.com

And let's make a deal today. Whenever there's a sunny side of the street, let's cross over to it.